Identifying and Achieving Individual Goals

February 23, 2015

How do you identify and achieve your goals?

20130222_Me_@_MYLC_with_Dick Elder

With Theta Chi National President Dick Elder (far left) and another alumnus on Friday, February 22, the evening before my session.

In the video below I am presenting an individual goal setting session at the Mid-Year Leadership Conference of Theta Chi Fraternity at UCLA on Saturday, February 23, 2013.

Having helped found the (dearly departed) UC Santa Barbara chapter of Theta Chi it was an honor to participate in this event as an alumnus instructor.

Since my birthday was the day before, it was a great gift to share my knowledge with undergraduate members of an organization I admire.

As an undergraduate I attended several events like this so I was well aware how events like this can positively impact personal growth and professional development.

I met with a multitude of motivated undergraduates; their earnest desire to improve themselves and their fraternity was inspiring. Events like this made me proud to be a Theta Chi and grateful to be a teacher.

Of course you don’t have to be a member of Theta Chi — or any other fraternal organization — to appreciate what I shared during my session. It is my hope you find value in my presentation beyond the audience for whom I first prepared it.

I welcome your insights and ideas as well; I am a teacher because I am a lifelong learner. It would be my pleasure to learn from and with you as I did on this day with my undergraduate brothers in Theta Chi!

To recap the content in the video:

  • Why setting your goals is important.
  • Goal setting brainstorming and audience interaction.
  • A personal story about how we undermine our goals.
  • How to focus yourself with help from your colleagues.
  • Why setting your goals (not someone else) is important.
  • A personal story about setting my goals after undergrad.
  • Dealing with parents who try to set your goals for you.
  • What happens when you don’t set goals for yourself.
  • How to set and achieve your goals with your I.D.E.A.

You can also view via Slideshare the presentation I used in the above video:


Resolve to Evolve in 2015

December 31, 2014

“You say you want a revolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world
You tell me that it’s evolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world…”

— The Beatles, Revolution

Matthew Gilbert in the Al Hatta desert on a desert safari.As 2014 draws to a close people start listing resolutions they intend to achieve in 2015.

Although well intended, 77% of people who make new year’s resolutions abandon them — many as early as the end of January.

I’ve never been much for making lists of resolutions, though as 2009 started I was inspired by Chris Brogan’s call to list three words that would inspire me and inform my decisions.

Ironically, in the months that followed my life took an unexpected turn that forever changed who I am and how I see the world. My three words were incredibly relevant some of the time, yet totally irrelevant at others. I survived a shock to my system that jarred me out of my comfort zone.

I learned that nothing is certain except the uncertainty of life. Yet, looking back over those five years I also realized something essential to my philosophy of lifelong learning: I evolved. What does that mean?


If you look at the definition to the left the word that pops out at me is “gradually.” This means change takes time and therefore requires something we all could use more of: patience.

Because most resolutions are transactional they are nearly impossible to achieve unless you precede them with a transformational realignment. If you don’t change how you see yourself and your situation, any short-term goals are doomed to fail because you won’t have an accurate benchmark.

So, with all due respect to The Beatles (see the lyrics to their song Revolution, above), evolution is more realistic than revolution, especially on a personal level.

Am I perfect now? Far from it; I am full of flaws and continuing to evolve as an individual. I suppose that’s the point, right? But I am more aware of myself and more engaged in my life than ever before. I am embracing ambiguity more than before and forcing myself out of my comfort zone.

The impact has been exceptional, both personally and professionally. Most notably, I relocated 8,000 miles away to Dubai, UAE for a full time teaching position  — just two short weeks after being offered the job(and having never before been to Dubai)!

Although Dubai is westernized in many ways, it has still provided me a wonderful opportunity to experience an entirely different culture than the one with which I was accustomed.

I am endeavoring to become the person who I should be, not who other people want me to be. I refuse to let others define me and decide for me.

I am doing this as much for myself as I am to show my two sons — whom I miss a great deal — that there is a world beyond the boundaries of the city in which they live. I want to inspire them to adventure by my actions. In the spirit of Robin William’s character in Dead Poets Society (John Keating) I embrace a philosophy of “Carpe Diem!”

I understand evolution is a process that happens  — wait for it — gradually. Ask Darwin: evolution is a transformational process that fundamentally changes something over a length of time, not a short period of time.  Just as I will never stop learning, I realize I will never be “done” evolving.

My evolution might have happened naturally as a function of maturity when I turned 40 earlier this year, but the process was was undoubtedly accelerated by the five years before it. While in the midst of the moment I was often overwhelmed with the challenges thrown my way, I now look back with gratitude for having been strengthened as a result.

Certainly you don’t have to go through what I did; you can find inspiration anywhere. If you need a little boost, however, you might enjoy reading the book “The Art of Possibility” by Benjamin Zander. You might also find insight by completing the StrengthsFinder analysis; it was fundamental in helping me realize teaching was my perfect profession.

So, will you resolve to evolve in 2015?


Getting Google+ “Auto Awesomed”

November 30, 2014


Yesterday I recorded a video for my online UCLA Extension Social Media Marketing course (MGMNT X460.398A) in an area under construction near my apartment in the Sports City area of Dubai, UAE. I’ve been living her shortly after I started teaching for Jumeira University this September.

Designed to mirror the content of Gary Vaynerchuck’s book Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook, the course challenges students to create a content marketing plan for a product, service, individual, or organization of their choice.

google+-auto-backupThe theme of the week for which I recorded the video is “Embracing Emerging Options.” As presented in the Round (Chapter) 8, Opportunities in Emerging Networks, the emerging social networks include LinkedIn, Google+, Vine, and Snapchat.

While today and even when the book was first published in November 2013 these platforms weren’t “new” in the literal sense none had yet achieved critical mass.

That said, Snapchat has quickly gained momentumVine has seen impressive growth,  LinkedIn has aggressively evolved from its initial role as an “online Rolodex,” yet the role and relevance of Google+ continues to fluctuate.

I was invited to join Google+ three years ago, early into it’s Beta launch. In the more than three years since I am still not quite sure what to do with it nor have I seen tremendous engagement on it, but I remain cautiously optimistic.

Speaking of which, if you’re not already doing so, please stop by my Google+ profile and follow me; I will do the same and, together we can enhance our experience on this platform with potential.

However, I actively use the Google+ Auto Backup feature and continue to be amused by the Google+ Auto Awesome functionality for photos and for Google+ Auto Awesome for videos as well.

And so it was remarkably coincidental (and strangely sentient) for Google+ to “Auto Awesome” my UCLA Extension video that included content about Google+ just a few hours later. It includes footage from the video I shot plus still shots I also took (yes, including a selfie; for shame).

Interestingly, it removed the actual audio track and made it more of a montage. More intriguing was the awkward yet entertaining  1980s sitcom style music Google+ added to the video!

So, without further delay, I present to you my Auto Awesome video:

Have you ever been Auto Awesomed?


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