Birdie and Me

Birdie and MeA stunning debut about a girl named Jack and her gender creative little brother, Birdie, searching for the place where they can be their true and best selves.

After their mama dies, Jack and Birdie find themselves without a place to call home. And when Mama's two brothers each try to provide one first sweet Uncle Carl, then gruff Uncle Patrick the results are funny, tender, and tragic.

They're also somehow . spectacular.

With voices and characters that soar off the page, J. M. M. Nuanez's debut novel depicts an unlikely family caught in a situation none of them would have chosen, and the beautiful ways in which they finally come to understand one another.

Pink Is for Boys

Pink Is for BoysAn empowering and educational picture book that proves colors are for everyone, regardless of gender.

Pink is for boys and girls and everyone! This timely and beautiful picture book rethinks and reframes the stereotypical blue/pink gender binary and empowers kids – and their grown ups – to express themselves in every color of the rainbow. Featuring a diverse group of relatable characters, Pink Is for Boys invites and encourages girls and boys to enjoy what they love to do, whether it's racing cars and playing baseball, or loving unicorns and dressing up. Vibrant illustrations help children learn and identify the myriad colors that surround them every day, from the orange of a popsicle, to the green of a grassy field, all the way up to the wonder of a multicolored rainbow.

Parents and kids will delight in Robb Pearlman's sweet, simple script, as well as its powerful message: life is not color coded.

Except When They Don't

Except When They Don'tThis rhyming picture book encourages children to celebrate their individuality and lets them know that it's okay to play with whatever toys they want to!Girls perform to fairy songs.Boys play football all day long.Boys yell, Boo! and run away. Girls like kittens and ballet.
Except when they don't.
Children are often told by many different people about what toys they're supposed to play with, what interests they should have, and who they should be simply because of their gender. This stereotype breaking book invites children to examine what they're told boy and girl activities are and encourages them to play with whatever they want to and to be exactly who they are! This book is published in partnership with GLAAD to accelerate LGBTQ inclusivity and acceptance.

Ho'onani: Hula Warrior

Ho'onani: Hula WarriorAn empowering celebration of identity, acceptance and Hawaiian culture based on the true story of a young girl in Hawaiʻi who dreams of leading the boys only hula troupe at her school.

Ho'onani feels in between. She doesn't see herself as wahine (girl) OR kane (boy). She's happy to be in the middle. But not everyone sees it that way.

When Ho'onani finds out that there will be a school performance of a traditional kane hula chant, she wants to be part of it. But can a girl really lead the all male troupe? Ho'onani has to try .

Based on a true story, Ho'onani: Hula Warrior is a celebration of Hawaiian culture and an empowering story of a girl who learns to lead and learns to accept who she really is and in doing so, gains the respect of all those around her.

Ho'onani's story first appeared in the documentary A Place in the Middle by filmmakers Dean Hamer and Joe Wilson.

Eve in Exile and the Restoration of Femininity

Eve in Exile and the Restoration of FemininityThe swooning Victorian ladies and the 1950s housewives genuinely needed to be liberated. That much is indisputable. So, First Wave feminists held rallies for women's suffrage. Second Wave feminists marched for Prohibition, jobs, and abortion. Today, Third Wave feminists stand firmly for nobody's quite sure what. But modern women—who use psychotherapeutic antidepressants at a rate never before seen in history—need liberating now than ever. The truth is, feminists don't know what liberation is. They have led us into a very boring dead end.

Eve in Exile sets aside all stereotypes of mid century housewives, of China doll femininity, of Victorians fainting, of women not allowed to think for themselves or talk to the men about anything interesting or important. It dismisses the pencil skirted and stiletto heeled executives of TV, the outspoken feminists freed from all that hinders them, the brave career women in charge of their own destinies. Once those fictionalized stereotypes are out of the way—whether they're things that make you gag or things you think look pretty fun—Christians can focus on real women. What did God make real women for?

Grilled Cheese and Dragons (Princess Pulverizer #1)

Grilled Cheese and Dragons (Princess Pulverizer #1)Meet the princess who'd rather wear a suit of armor than a crown!

Princess Serena (or as she prefers, Princess Pulverizer) doesn't want to be a princess she wants to be knight! But her father, King Alexander of Empiria, thinks she still has a lot to learn when it comes to exhibiting valiant behavior. So he presents a challenge: the princess must first go on a Quest of Kindness and perform good deeds to prove that she truly deserves to go to knight school. With help from a friendly dragon named Dribble and a perpetually terrified knight in training named Lucas, can she complete her quest and discover what it really takes to be a hero?

Big Boys Cry

Big Boys CryLet boys cry! This picture book imagines a world in which boys are encouraged to express their full range of emotions.

It's Levi's first day at a new school, and he's scared. When his father tries to comfort Levi, he falls back on the line his own father used to use with him: Big boys don't cry. Though he immediately understands his misstep, he can't find the words to right the ship, and Levi leaves for school, still in need of reassurance.

Fortunately, along his walk to school, Levi sees instance after instance of grown men openly expressing their sadness and fear. His learned mantra, big boys don't cry, slowly weakens, and by the time he's at school he releases a tear. Once there, things aren't so bad after all, and on his walk home he sees the characters he's encounted on his journey in the aftermath of their expression.

Upon his arrival home, he finds his father waiting for him on their porch, tears in his eyes. He's able to admit that he was scared for Levi, and the two embrace, closer than before.

Jonty Howley's gorgeous debut paints the world we wish existed for our boys, and offers a path there! This story is the truest interpretation of the notion that we should let boys be boys; that is: let them express the full range of their emotions, vulnerable pieces and all!

Mary Wears What She Wants

Mary Wears What She WantsInspired by the true story of Mary Edwards Walker, a trailblazing doctor who bucked the gender expectations of her time, this is a fresh, charming picture book about a young girl who decides to wear what she wants: pants!

Once upon a time (but not too long ago), girls only wore dresses.

And only boys wore pants.

Until one day, a young girl named Mary had a bold idea: She would wear whatever she wanted. And she wanted to wear pants!

Inspired by the true story of Mary Edwards Walker, a trailblazing doctor who was arrested many times for wearing pants, this fresh, charming picture book encourages readers to think for themselves while gently challenging gender and societal norms.

Lucia the Luchadora

Lucia the LuchadoraLucia zips through the playground in her cape just like the boys, but when they tell her girls can't be superheroes, suddenly she doesn't feel so mighty. That's when her beloved abuela reveals a dazzling secret: Lucia comes from a family of luchadoras, the bold and valiant women of the Mexican lucha libre tradition. Cloaked in a flashy new disguise, Lucia returns as a recess sensation! But when she's confronted with a case of injustice, Lucia must decide if she can stay true to the ways of the luchadora and fight for what is right, even if it means breaking the sacred rule of never revealing the identity behind her mask.

Who Are You?: The Kid's Guide to Gender Identity

Who Are You?: The Kid's Guide to Gender IdentityWhat do you like? How do you feel? Who are you?

This brightly illustrated children's book provides a straightforward introduction to gender for anyone aged 4+. It presents clear and direct language for understanding and talking about how we experience gender: our bodies, our expression and our identity. An interactive three layered wheel included in the book is a simple, yet powerful, tool to clearly demonstrate the difference between our body, how we express ourselves through our clothes and hobbies, and our gender identity. Ideal for use in the classroom or at home, a short page by page guide for adults at the back of the book further explains the key concepts and identifies useful discussion points.

This is a one of a kind resource for understanding and celebrating the gender diversity that surrounds us.

Beautiful

BeautifulEvery girl is unique, talented, and lovable Every girl is BEAUTIFUL.Much than how one looks on the outside, true beauty is found in conquering challenges, showing kindness, and spreading contagious laughter. Beautiful girls are empowered and smart and strong!BEAUTIFUL breaks barriers by showing girls free to be themselves: splashing in mud, conducting science experiments, and reading books under a flashlight with friends. This book will encourage all girls to embrace who they are and realize their endless potential.

Ogilvy

OgilvyThe clothes don't make the bunny in this new picture book from
New York Times
bestselling author Deborah Underwood, illustrated by T. L. McBeth.When Ogilvy moves to a new town, the possibilities feel endless. There are so many new bunny friends and fun things to do together! But in this town, bunnies in dresses play ball and knit socks, and bunnies in sweaters make art and climb rocks. Ogilvy wants to do everything—and won't let a sweater or a dress get in the way.