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Nietzsche is a Rorschach blot for Americans blue collar workers housewives Christians political activists artists intellectuals Americans see in Nietzsche what they most desire freedom from the dead morals of a corrupt and decadent consumer society And they see in Nietzsche what they most fear a world without ultimate justification other than what the self can justify to itself by itself Ratner Rosenhagen documents America s wide ranging disparate fascinations with Nietzsche in a fluent fast paced transfixing intellectual history that falters only a little at the end Nietzsche was barely noticed during his lifetime What also has one unnoticed is the influence of Emerson on him As an avid and lifelong reader of Emerson s Essays Nietzsche arrived at his concept of the sovereign selfFrom Emerson Nietzsche learned to become a self reliant intellectual provocateur It may have been the Emerson in Nietzsche that struck such a resonant chord in Nietzsche s American audience Whatever the reason Americans enthusiastically thought through Nietzsche to think about themselves as Americans in a modern America Many Americans remembered where they were when they first read Nietzsche such was the effect of his words on them For many Nietzsche represented deliverance from the reigning and competing materialChristian world views For political radicals in tune with European thought currents than most of their fellow citizens Nietzsche represented a philosophical dawn that they hoped would break in America In any case Nietzsche represented a successful challenge to existing authority Notwithstanding Nietzsche s diverse appeal however the American mainstream media either ignored him or downplayed him For many this was just further evidence of America s intellectual philistinism Bad press aside Nietzsche still became an American celebrity And yet there was a tension between the new celebrity s criticism of progressivism s regressive effects on the one hand and America s native progressivism and democratic optimism on the other This was evident in the response of Christians to Nietzsche s attack on Christianity Many American Christians embraced him not to dispense with their faith but the strengthen it Nietzsche forced them to confront the uestion What is a modern Christian Liberal Protestants understood the answer to Nietzsche as a reinvigorating call to social ethics they accordingly took their theology into the public suare Nietzsche showed them that their ideas could be worth living The person of Nietzsche exercised particular influence on American literacy radicals and political reformers They described Nietzsche with intoxicatingly intimate terms as though he had invented his philosophy for them personally His life was the template for their ideal lives The backlash against Nietzsche during WWI merely confirmed in their minds the power of his pen and personality Nietzsche taught them that ideas were experience and words were action And that the wages of enius were bitter indeed Out of their experience with Nietzsche was born that peculiarly American discipline cultrual criticism Truth was not to be tested against the world as it was but against the world as the critic wished it to be Writers and thinkers such as Walter Lippmann understood however that it wasn t enough to tear down America s cherished philosophy of ends something had to replace it But what Nietzsche showed Americans only the method by which to attack cherished ideals The radicals and reformers would have to themselves identify the replacement ideals It wasn t just intellectual and political elites who found inspiration in Nietzsche s life and works Ordinary Americans saw in Nietzsche a long wished for deliverance from the dead hand of Christianity and the bankrupt promises of market capitalism Judging from the historical record many Americans lived lives of uiet desperation feeling themselves to be radical others Nietzsche injected their lives with courage Nietzsche was dead by the time he had ained popular hold over the American imagination so his devotees wrote to his sister fervently seeking some sacred icon a photograph and autograph a book from his library by which they could tangibly possess Nietzsche Because according to the author Nietzsche had possessed them He had possessed them in some cases as a demiurge letters to Nietzsche s sister often referred to him by capitalizing the males pronouns Him and He Letter writers volunteered to translate his works and spread them through America to make his words flesh Ordinary Americans were exhilarated and appalled by Nietzsche s concept of the overman Through the lens of the overman Americans viewed the highs and lows of moral life and democracy Intellectuals like Josiah Royce saw the overman as the way to create ultimate value in a world without inherent ultimate value Others like Irving Babbitt saw the overman as a dangerous destructive idea that ultimately undermined all value With the advent of WWI American opinion swung toward Babbitt s point of view The overman as realized by Imperial Germany was a threat to modern civilization If WWI wasn t enough to cool American s enthusiasm for Nietzsche the Nazis were It was left to the scholarship of a young Jewish scholar and refugee from Nazi Germany Walter Kaufmann to rehabilitate Nietzsche reputation among Americans Kaufmann believed Nietzsche was a serious philosopher who fit comfortably within the Enlightenment tradition Kaufmann s rhetorical enius was to recast Nietzsche as an answer to America s Cold War anxieties such as the public concern over collectivist movements and ideologies According to Kaufmann Nietzsche was not a totalitarian but akin to rational pragmatists in the tradition of James and Dewey Rather than appeal to external authority to justify his ideas Nietzsche preached that ideas must justify themselves Thus it was not power but personal autonomy that formed the core of Nietzsche s philosophy This was an message that Americans were ready to hear though many in the 60s such as the Black Panthers like their activist predecessors from the turn of the century mistook Nietzsche s ospel of self realization for a call to political activism Then in the 70s and 80s the French Decade of Despair got ahold of Nietzsche And here is where the book regrettably ends for the author s aim is to show that American philosophy analytic and anti Continental though it may be is cross fertilized by European thinkers Except the postmodernists and deconstructionists are to thinking what speaking in tongues is to conversation Their ugly and eccentric jargon acts as a sort of secret handshake to the initiated which must be a smallroup indeed The rest of us must simply respond with Huh I confess a strong bias against this particular French school if I haven t confessed it already It is difficult to understand someone who insists nothing can be understood at least in a way that is ordinarily understood In the final chapter the author tries to make the likes of Rorty Derrida and Foucault relevant to Americans She fails Just because Nietzsche struck a spark in the American moral imagination doesn t mean that philosophers who were professional Nietzsche readers had a similar or even remotely similar effect They did not and her chapter on the French is just an insider s shout out to the insular world of academe from somewhere inside it But the disappointing final chapter does not detract from what is otherwise an amazing intellectual history of the influence of Nietzsche on the American mind He was exactly what Americans needed him to be when they needed him to be it divine prophet of the sovereign self political radical destroyer of religious and moral idols and totalitarian demon While Americans may never have understood Nietzsche perfectly or even at all they certainly came to understand themselves through him There s like 120% of a book here but it s broken into parts there s 80% of a brilliant intellectual history of America from the 1890s to around World War I and then there s 40% of an informative but much constrained intellectual history from the 1950s to the 1990s The first would rate four stars the second two and so the compromise is three They are awkwardly welded together with an interlude which I What Was Lost guess is unratedJRR wants to examine how Americans made sense of the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche his ideas and persona as reports about him and his writing started percolating to America in the 1890s shortly before he died and he became a central touchstone in the years leading up to World War II for numerous intellectualroups in America Early on she writes that the book seeks to demonstrate that reception history can be ambitious than simply enumerating the varieties of uses of a thinker or a body of thought in a new national context While it shows that a multitude of American Nietzsches have appeared over the course of the century it is not content with exposing sheer variety Rather this study argues that confrontations with Nietzsche laid bare fundamental concern driving modern American thought namely the uestion of the Go-Go-Go! grounds or foundations for modern American thought and the culture itself First it shows how American encounters with Nietzsche ignited and revealed larger anxieties about the source and authority of modern pluralist society Second it demonstrates how Americans engagement with Nietzsche inspired and exposed long standing concerns about the conditions of American culture for intellectual life which overestimates the historiographic novelty of her approach but does aood job of constraining the narrative not every way in which Nietzsche might have been imagined in America but ways that Nietzsche and his thought were used to understand what authority meant and whether America could ever create a Somato Respiratory Integration Workbook great cultureThe earliest partsive a brief biography of Nietzsche emphasizing ironically that he was especially influenced by the American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson an inheritance that was mostly although not entirely ignored UNTIL THE 1990S SHE SUGGESTS SUBTLY the 1990s She suggests subtly one reason Americans might have been relatively uick to pick up on Nietzsche is that he was so connected with main lines of American thought even if those associations were sometimes hard to seeThe first official chapter Reine Mädchensache gives an overview of her argument showing how the uestions raised by Nietzsche were pressing for Americans In brief Nietzsche argued that there were no firm foundational forms of knowledge or values they were historical creations that changed over time The person willing to accept that we lived in a world without foundations though did not despair over the imminent ending of civilization but imagined new forms of life and strove to transcend the conditions of the world in some not entirely clear way As reports about him and his ideas trickled into America during the 1890s he became as one philosopher said the enfant terrible of modernism raising uestions about how a mass industrial society was to deal with its inheritance of traditions and religion These uestions though JRR emphasizes were not exclusive to the intellectual caste but cut across high and low brow writing Indeed consideration of Nietzsche helpedive rise to that distinctionMost prominent among the early adopters besides the students of philosophy who traveled to Germany for education at the time Germany s universities were the best in the world and discovered him in informal ways were left leaning progressives and liberationists socialists and anarchists and other radicals looking for an excuse to brush away past traditions and usher in a new world He was strongly associated with Egoism His personal story was especially impressive a sickly man who battled to expose his soul in searching ways eventually driven mad by it all As the story went And that fit with the tenor of the radicals s projects presented all of these people with an important new critical mode of thought a Animal Babies gigantic naysayer At the same time his devotees had to struggle with not letting Nietzsche become Nietzscheism a mere worshipping of his thought as though it presented the end of philosophy rather than an enjoinder to continue The only little nagging doubt this first chapter leaves is that all of his early interpreters were necessarily limited in what they could see while the author JRR somehow stands outside of time and history and can understood the full Nietzsche She does provide some evidence as the book progresses pointing to aspects of Nietzsche s thoughts that particular interpreters missed or ignored Still no one can have the definitive interpretation of Nietzsche And this problem will especially hurt the second of the two books hereThe second chapter looks at religious responses to Nietzsche that theologians felt the need to deal with an atheistic German philosopher already shows that he had become important in America even if he remained outside the academy in his homeland JRR notes a continuum of responses to Nietzsche that add subtly and to our understanding f religion at this time Typically the mainline of American religion at the beginning of the twentieth century islossed as liberal progressive and open to secular knowledge it is religious leaders who are so often involved in the progressive movement But Nietzsche challenged that orientation Here was a secular philosopher who presented not just material or scientific evidence to which religion needed to adapt but undermine the very notion of religion as a repository of eternal veritiesThis attack made some liberal protestants uestion their receptivity to secular knowledge and wonder if they shouldn t turn back to faith alone Other liberals protestants were amenable to Nietzsche they saw in him for example a version of the pragmatist philosophy that was then dominant in America The uestion wasn t whether any particular value or tradition was handed down from God but which values worked the best in society it was a matter of experimentation On the far end of this line of thought stood the Chicago theologian George Burman Foster who raised Nietzsche to a kind of christ like status meanwhile the historical of Christ like status Meanwhile the historical was reduced to an. If you were looking for a philosopher likely to appeal to Americans Friedrich Nietzsche would be far from your first choice After all in his blazing career Nietzsche took aim at nearly all the foundations of modern American life Christian morality the Enlightenment faith in reason and the idea of human euality Despite that for than a century Nietzsche has been a hugely popular and surprisingly influential figure in American thought and cultureIn American Nietzsche Jennifer Ratner Rosenhagen delves deeply into Nietzsche's philosophy and America’s reception of it to tell the story of his curious appeal Beginn. American NietzscheL death UW Madison Professor Jennifer Ratner Roshenhagen has written here a wonderful volume on the impact of Nietzsche on the United States of all places After all in her own words What is the philosophy of an anti christian antidemocratic madman doing in a culture like ours Why Nietzsche Why in AmericaThis is not a history of American Nietzscheans It is a history of American readers making their way into their views of themselves and their modern American by thinking through against and around Nietzsche s stark challengesHer wonderfully lucid introduction bears out the relationship between the works of Emerson and the well known works of Nietzsche Famously a figure who cast off intellectual forebears with Offenders and Detainees great alacrity Nietzsche nevertheless maintained a fascination and respect for Emerson s thought throughout his life This is brought full circle in the final chapter in the work of Cavell attempting to bring Nietzschean thought clearly into the discussion of what was American and what was ContinentalAlong the way Jennifer Ratner Rosenhagen takes you through the reception of this singular philosopher by turn of the century American theologians the New Humanists Irving Babbitt in particular the deconstruction of Derrida and the New French Nietzsche the conflict of Adorno s and Kaufmann s treatments Richard Rorty and the impact of On the Genealogy of Morals on the early foundational work of literary critic Harold Bloom What youet is a very clear treatment of each of these figures while at the same time a lucid presentation as to how they made this philosopher their own either by distancing his work from his biography over obsessing on his life to the detriment of serious study of his work deliberate obfuscation of certain points of his to make his work palatable and many other modes of license takingThe reatest amount of time is spent on Walter Kaufmann s work in lifting Nietzsche out of the obscurity of postwar thought and lazy association with Germany s martial philosophy and sheer depravity The prevailing view that the mad philosopher was responsible for the philosophical undergirding of both world war movements was one that was preventing serious discussion of this figure in any substantive way in academia and broadly Once again you see figures trying to cloak their worldview in the arb of reat thinkers whom they haven t read and couldn t possibly comprehend but Kaufmann effectively showed this for the utter fatuity it was His standout profile of Nietzsche is still a principal text in the study of the figure and Jennifer Ratner Rosenhagen does an excellent job making his role in the reading and reception of Nietzsche very clear In summation this is a wonderfully clear volume on a fascinating figure that should be read by all Though I wasn t flummoxed by the notion of Nietzsche enjoying success as a subject of American readership and discourse the author here does a wonderful job chronicling a century s worth of debate on the man and his work Titanic scholarship of the titan philosopher A bit repetitive but most lengthy scholarship tends toward repetition Could really do without some of the antiuarian inspired trivia in the middle sections her so called ephemera A couple of really ood reviews here on Dead-End Road Mysteries goodreads alreadyAs an aside it s hard not to be a little bewildered at the appropriation of Nietzsche by so many different and politically opposedroups but his feverish and brilliant ramblings must attract the attention of any intelligent mind that detects tension in the world or in hisher life Perhaps his celebrity is only a bit bewildering than the celebrity of say Elvis The creation of the celebrity is really what this book is about It s culturalintellectual historyThings do Hear the Wolves get a little serious in chapter 5 perhaps the most impressive and serious bit of the book But oneets the impression that when she writes about Walter Kaufmann she is really writing about herself Her attempts to distance herself from Kaufmann are inadeuate she or less adopts his view Her obligatory dance with Adorno is not altogether serious she wants to de provincialize Nietzsche But she fails in her attempts Not that one is not looking to assign blame or even to imply causation between war and the philosopher But if one hopes to understand things from a transnational perspective as she says she hopes to to She fails to come to terms with the importance of his ideas takes away Nietzsche s fangs his role in broader historical projects The book is decidedly provincial She does not care about influence or Valors Measure global movements only about conversations Conversations are not dangerous Nietzsche is dangerousHow is it that the Leopold Loeb trial receives scant attention a few paragraphs One would think it would occupy a much central place in her narrativeAlso it s hard not to be at least a little bewildered by the contemporary tendency to appropriate and fawn over his aphorisms In other words I might hesitate before appropriating one of his admittedly brilliant aphorisms and hanging it in my parlor considering the final destination of his superman for what slowly killed Nietzsche clearly did not make him stronger For all his sheer and spectacular brilliance this was a man clearly very sick his contempt for the human condition and for anything approaching weakness is than a little chilling He illuminates and makes stark some fundamental uestions about the individual value and states of belonging But a thoroughgoing contempt for human existence is not readily found perhaps even nihilistic than some of Dostoevsky s narrators In an article I wrote on my personal blog about the infamous prosecution of John T Scopes an American teacher put on trial in 1925 in Dayton Tennessee for teaching the Darwinian view of evolution contrary to local law I made the point that Clarence Darrow Scope s defence attorney was an enthusiast for the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche as well as the biology of Charles Darwin He was influenced here by H L Mencken a leading American journalist It was Mencken who introduced the German thinker to America in his 1908 book The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche His Nietzsche came as an angry Moses a prophet armed ready to knock away the cosy nostrums of American life The strong onlyrow stronger by despising the weak and so far as Mencken was concerned by despising Christian morality The Scopes trial was an ideal opportunity to pour scorn on booboisie the backward ignoramuses of the Southern Bible Belt That s one American perspective on Nietzsche Interestingly a totally different one was to come from another participant in the Scopes trial William Jennings Bryant a former presidential candidate who acted for the prosecution The year before he appeared at the trial of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb this time for the defence both accused of the kidnap and murder of a teenage boy for no better reason than to prove that they were Supermen beyond all conventional notions of ood and evil At least that was Darrow s argument claiming that they were acting under the influence of Beyond Good and Evil Bryant won both cases clear in the first at least insofar as his clients escaped the death penalty pyrrhic in the second But perhaps his immediate victory was over Mencken and Nietzsche His view certainly was in harmony with American thought insofar as Americans thought of Nietzsche at all After all this was a thinker contaminated by association with German militarism then even contaminated by association with the Nazis What is the philosophy of an anti Christian antidemocratic madman doing in a culture like ours Why Nietzsche Why in America Actually these uestions are not mine They are posed by Jennifer Ratner Rosenhagen in American Nietzsche A History of an Icon and His Ideas published by the University of Chicago Press at the beginning of last month The answers she makes clear in the course of this lively thoughtful and entertaining book It begins with America and it ends with America or rather it begins with American thought and ends with American thought You see when I was a teenager I was reading Nietzsche when Nietzsche was a teenager he was reading Emerson It was in the essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson that Nietzsche found a brother soul as he puts it Here was a thinker free from all inherited burden a believer in the sovereignty of the self full of scepticism about traditional morality and received religion The most fertile author this century so far has been an American he declared Nietzsche used Emerson not to et closer to him but to Tni Tata Dunia Baru Sistem Pertahanan get closer to himself as Ratner Rosenhagen puts it I would simply add that Americans in their various ways have used Nietzsche toet closer to themselves To use the clich here is a man and a thinker who has been all things to all people His admirers did not just include obvious social Darwinists like Mencken but Emma Goldman and others on the left who saw Nietzsche s attacks on democracy and religion as a way of arousing the masses from their lethargy He was also admired by Jack London a socialist whose views on the degeneracy of the herd are not so far removed from those of Mencken There is also Margaret Sanger the high priestess of American birth control who read Nietzsche selectively attracted to his views on Christian sexual ethics ignoring his obvious misogyny That s just the thing about Nietzsche and America he has been read selectively something the author herself is mildly وصف الاستعباد في مملكة فاس - مذكرات أسير سويدي على عهد السلطان مولاي عبد الله guilty of a point I ll come to a bit later He has been sanitised if you like made acceptable to an American audience a democratic audience an audience where every man and woman has the capacity for endless self discovery It s the Superman as the ordinary man It s true that his reputation suffered unjustly by association with the Nazis but after the war America wasiven a new reading Here was a soulful voyager for the existential age an interpretation advanced irony of ironies by Walter Kaufmann a Jewish scholar and translator who escaped to the States from Nazi Germany in 1939 The American Nietzsche as Ratner Rosenhagen makes clear in a dedicated chapter is largely Kaufmann s Nietzsche I have to be frank and say it s a slightly dishonest interpretation wholesome and less challenging than the raw original In some of the bizarre readings I m reminded of the character of Otto in the movie A Fish Called Wanda who when accused of being an ape said that apes don t read philosophy Yes they do Otto came Wanda s response They just don t understand it How else is one to interpret the view of Huey Newton the co founder of the Black Panther Movement that Nietzsche thought slave morality was a ood thing One of my favourite chapters is devoted to the fan mail sent by ordinary and unknown Americans and kept by Elizabeth the philosopher s Nazi sympathising sister a woman who did to poison his legacy than any other individual Some of theses missives are beyond eccentric There is one letter of condolence sent after the philosopher s death in 1900 by John I Bush of Duluth Minnesota who announced to Elizabeth that he was the Superman her brother had been looking for May you hereby have the consolation and delight to have lived long enough to know that the visions prophecies and hopes of your brother the consolation and delight to have lived long enough to know that the visions prophecies and hopes of your brother been fulfilled to the very letter for the author of this scribbling is the very man prognosticated in Zarathustra Bush hmm is there any connection here I wonder Now I said earlier that the author is slightly uilty over her own misreading Her book she claims is less about Nietzsche than interpretations of Nietzsche But if she begins with Emerson she also ends with Emerson by way of Harold Bloom Stanley Cavell and Richard Rorty all of whom have tamed Nietzsche to a degree leaving out his of whom have tamed Nietzsche to a degree leaving out his democratic sentiments Yes it s Nietzsche by way of Emerson a transcendentalist free of the sarcasm and aggression so evident in his manner of thought and mode of expression This is a philosopher for all seasons a philosopher for an American season It is perhaps a misreading but who cares I m sure Nietzsche the Voice of Conscience greatest of all of thereat iconoclasts would have loved it as much as I loved this book as much as I admire a country and a people who are continually striving for fresh and novel interpretations It s the very thing that keeps thought alive Nietzsche In The United StatesJennifer Ratner Rosenhagen s book American Nietzsche A History of an Icon and his Ideas 2011 examines the reception of the German philosop Some time ago I mentioned to my wife that I d been experiencing strange existential crises and I had just noticed and it was odd to me She replied that perhaps I was having a mid life crisis and yep because she s smart and that sounds about right She thought for a moment and asked if I had read any Nietzsche lately I considered this wonderful advice as she is trained and degreed in philosophy and has a wonderful mind for such things and I respect her opinions reatly It s not like she would or could say have you read your Bible lately so I thought read Nietzsche was a splendid suggestion worth exploration So I hunted around for a work that appealed to me and I This book Ratner Rosenhagen asserts is less about Nietzsche than it is about how Americans appropriated his idea since the late 19th century Yet she does end up sharing plenty about Nietzsche s life and his philosophy It s fascinating to learn that an anti democratic anti Christian and anti collectivist thinker would be met with such praise to the extent of worshipping as Nietzche in the United States Specially interesting is how his writings inspired Rosa Luxemburg and Huey P Newton although Christians of several denominations scholars socialists and poets also found ways to reshape the philosopher to fit their ideas and ideologyRatner Rosenhagen s masterful research oozes in every page and she mostly writes with sharp and delightful acumen Yet she tends to exaggerate to what extent Nietzsche s ideas influenced common American life Despite unconvincing at times this book is as ood as academic writing oes If Nietzsche sparks your interest or if you are well versed in his thoughts or enjoy intellectual history this book will enlighten. ??s claims for the death of God his challenge to universal truth and his insistence on the interpretive nature of all human thought and beliefs At the same time she explores how his image as an iconoclastic immoralist was put to work in American popular culture making Nietzsche an unlikely posthumous celebrity capable of inspiring both teenagers and scholars alikeA  penetrating examination of a powerful but little explored undercurrent of twentieth century American thought and culture American Nietzsche dramatically recasts our understanding of American intellectual life and puts Nietzsche suarely at its hea.

Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review

Exemplary person a model but not the iver of laws There was no path back to the old time religion Foster said only a Nietzschean path forward in which there are no ultimate objective foundations of life but a longing for a encompassing lusty but not lustful existence It is little surprise then that Foster found a friend in Margaret Anderson publisher of the seminal Little Review in Chicago and part of that city s modernist literary renaissanceCatholic theologians in particular were opposed to Nietzsche s ideas but thought that his coming was Marvins Room good Religion had become too soft they thought and Nietzsche forced them to defend their views to strengthen themselves In this matter then it wasn t so much that the theologians used Nietzsche or appropriated him but that they were responding to him This train of thought also ran into the muscular Christianity of the day and also intersected with concerns over the feminization of culture thus connecting the Nietzsche industry to broader concerns about as JRR said the possibility of creating aenuine culture in AmericaThe third chapter looks into how Americans understood the concept of the Ubermensch what became known in American culture as the Superman This was the human replacement of God in Nietzsche s thought someone who understood the he historicity of all values who stripped himself metaphysically naked and rather than despair plunged into he maelstrom of life creating a being so strong and wonderful so transcendental in its way that the person would be fine living that same life again and again for all of history In many ways this was a response to Goethe s Faustian tragedy There came to be two Roberto to the Dark Tower Came general ways in which Nietzsche s superman was understood in American cultureThe first was that there was a divide in society itself between the masters and the slaves the ubermensch and the hoi polloi Interestingly this ideal of the superman was even taken up by feminists such as Margaret Sanger who used it to critiue and unlorify traditional notions of motherhood H L Mencken particularly absorbed this strain of Nietzsche and incorporated it into his writing throughout his life it was the basis for his dismissal of the low brow the Booboisie Through Mencken and others this Nietzschean set of ideas also set the stage for the historical reconstruction of the Puritan as a Polyphemus grumpy Philistine and suasher of all thingsood JRR notes that before this period the Puritan was a known historical figure but with no particular dour valencesOthers saw the dynamic that Nietzsche described between master and slave about the will to power not so much as a critiue of mass democracy or a worry that America as a mass industrialized society could never have a true culture but as an internal psychological dynamic inherent in each person each person had parts of themselves that were rooted in convention and failed to live up to the standard of the superman and each person was meant to sound themselves find those parts and uproot them Among this cadre of thinkers was the radical Randolph Bourne who dying at 32 never had a chance to fully mature his thought Bourne complained that those like Mencken threatened to create their own rigid value system based around Nietzsche rather than constantly challenging themselves and it is certainly true that Mencken through life became increasingly self satisfiedChapter three then switches focus somewhat and starts to conclude the first part of the book when it was really only 80% done What JRR has done to this point is smart and shows a vast amount of reading It is nuanced and attuned to historical ironies the way Christians used Nietzsche for example as well as novelty the puritan being a historical revision created in the wake of Nietzsche s thought And the book to this point has been elegantly written with a minimum of jargon and a nice use of narrative markers to keep the book and reader on trackThe part that is missing though is any critiue of science Nietzsche pulled the rug out from under all systems of thought not just religious but scientific too And there were scientific critics at the time some were inspired by another German thinker Max Weber and one does wonder if there was an overlap in Nietzschean interpretations and Weberian ones but JRR never deals with this issue Some were explicitly Nietzschean as in the case of Ben Hecht who is mentioned but not really studied It is almost as if JRR is as constrained in her interpretations as Mencken himself who used Nietzsche to critiue old time religion and Victorian morals but held science apart from any such critiue There was a sociology of knowledge being developed at the time admittedly much of it in Germany or among Marxists Ludwig Fleck Karl Mannheim Boris Hessen and some of it was focused on science in particular but this all oes unexplored It s why the first book is only 80% completeWhat JRR does in the rest of the chapter is sow the seeds for Nietzsche s eventual decline in America during World War I and again around the time of the second world war There were of course straight critics of Nietzsche among the intellectual class as well as among Theologians in particular the New Humanists who tried to dismiss the German philosopher as an extension of Romanticism s twaddle But as JRR shows in constructing this version of Nietzsche they had to ignore his own critiues of Romanticism particularly Rousseau More damning for Nietzsche were political changes As German bellicosity increased and the world was drawn into war Nietzsche was reinterpreted as a kind of id of the German national identity idealistic concerned with power and aesthetics willing to o to battle for his ideas The Superman was stripped of its reconstructive possibilities and became a purely destructive idea that the Germans believed a superior form of humans needed to smash the world and rule its wreckageChapter four looks closely at the radical intellectuals inspired by Nietzsche JRR seems to suggest that it is an open uestion whether Nietzsche had a lasting influence on them but he did shape the thought of the time and they did have immediate often visceral reactions and she is interested in capturing these as part of the lived experience of this cohort Another way this book is brilliant bringing the history of the body into intellectual history Nietzsche emboldened literary radicals and taught them that theirs was not jus a enerational fight but the overthrow the transvaluation of an entire body of values and traditions civilization was on the cusp of decline and they could create a brand new one a modern one And there is was Nietzsche underwriting modernity The task of the modern thinker instead was to balance the deconstructive with the regenerative to apply the acids of intellect on debilitating beliefs while employing a playful imagination to contemplate the ideals that enliven the spirit The Gay Science the Title Of Which Was Based On Emerson of which was based on Emerson a model for this kind of creative construction challenging authors to create new realities new ways in which the human individual could be valorized and made free against the constraints of mass society commercialism and industrial capitalism The sheer variety of those influenced by Nietzsche is a testimony to why a book like this needed to be written There s Mencken and Bourne the Chicago Renaissance Upton Sinclair and Van Wyck Brooks There s Mencken and Bourne the Chicago Renaissance Upton Sinclair and Van Wyck Brooks used Nietzsche to help erect the division between high brown and low brow Emma erect the division between high brown and low brow Emma too And then surprising figures such as Kahlil Gibran the Persian emigre whose book The Prophet reworked Nietzsche and went on to become a world wide best seller for decadesHaving wrapped up her survey with the exception of a chapter on science JRR shifts ears Following that chapter comes an interlude with JRR surveying material from Americans at the Nietzsche archive which was maintained for a long time by his sister Some themes are continued such as a focus on the embodied experience readers had when first coming across Nietzsche and the way Nietzsche s persona was interwoven with his thought such that many people asked for something from him even after he was dead an autograph for a collection a photograph There s also some discussion of Americans worrying over the uality of the translations which was in part a worry about the state of American culture and whether it was strong enough to hold onto someone like Nietzsche But as JRR admits these letters are ephemera and we barely know who the people are It s an interesting enough bit of the story but one feels it could have been integrated into the above thematic chapters rather than pulled outBut perhaps the reason it is not is because after the interlude a second book breaks out again one interesting enough but not as complex dense or fascinating as the one we have just left behind Chapter five deals mostly with Walter Kauffman a German emigre who translated most of Nietzsche into English and became the leading interpreter of his thought from the 1950s through the 1970s JRR notes that there were some other voices dealing with Nietzsche during the era when Kauffman was still young and focuses on another German emigre Theodor Adorno who used Nietzsche to critiue the entire Enlightenment project the Nazis Adorn said embodied rationality and Enlightenment values and that was totalitarianism America built on those same values was creating a different kind of totalitarianism one organized around a culture industry The Nietzschean individual was being suffocatedBut Adorno was mostly ignored in his own time and JRR is mostly fascinated with Kauffman to the point that this chapter focuses only on him He is the main interpreter of Nietzsche and so the only one worth exploring at this time or so she says which Mail Horror Bride (One Nation Under Zombies gives this chapter none of the richness complexity or nuance of the earlier ones According to JRR Kauffman made Nietzsche acceptable to an America that had just fought Germany in a world war for the second time by downplaying his darker aspects and attacks on foundational values and making him seem of an existentialist thinker at a time when existentialism from France was influencing American thought Kauffman also linked Nietzsche to American philosophical pragmatism And so one could see Nietzsche picked up on the right and the left as a standard bearer against 1950s conformity bit Peter Vlerick son of George Sylvester and a conservative and Lionel Trilling found him invigoratingThe final chapter regains some of the nuance of the early part of the book but still seems to be telling a story very different from the first chapters it is about a rediscovery of another Nietzsche this one in light of French intellectual fads and the rise of neoConservatism It s worth noting how much of the praise on the back of the book comes from conservative outlets which is relatively unusual in academic publishingA Nietzsche different than Kauffman s was reimported into America during the 1970s and 1980s through the translation of French theoreticians particularly Michel Foucault and Jacues Derrida Both of them were drawn to his attacks on the foundations of values and knowledge These thinkers would feed int an explicit attack on the authority of science but again JRR shies away from considering this aspect of Nietzschean thought She does mention though that he informed a latereneration of feminists with Eve Kofosky Sedgwick and Judith Butler using him to attack essentialist notions of Doros asin mga Anghel genderConservatives blanched at these various academic attacks on traditional values and seeming proselytization of relativism Nietzsche was a sign that the Ivory Tower was bankrupt Allan Bloom made this point in his The Closing of the American Mind arguing that until the coming of French theory and Nietzsche America had been innocent of such heretical thinking As obviously untrue as this was Bloom was still a nuanced thinker and even as he chastised American intellectuals embrace of Nietzsche and relativism he used Nietzsche to show why this was a bad idea for in an American mass democracy the burning of the foundations would lead to the mediocre taking control of everything His student Francis Fukuyama expressed similar worries in his The End of HistoryThere were other thinkers too he used Nietzsche s antifoundationalism in other ways Richard Rorty for example Especially worthwhile here is another conservative thinker Harold Bloom unrelated to Allan who looked at Nietzsche in his study The Anxiety of Influence which was about how every author is in some kind of Oedipal relationship with thereat authors that preceded them Bringing the story full circle Harold Bloom noted that Nietzsche was indebted to the American Ralph Waldo EmersonAnd so there is a way in which the two books here interact and I can see the temptation of yoking them together Maybe it was even a The Other Alice great idea What do I know The author is very smart and the University of Chicago Press puts out the best academic books so maybe the two belong under one cover Whether they do or not you re stilletting 120% On the other hand looking back on the success the book had especially with the The Inside Text great artist to whom it addressed itself as if in a conversation that is with Richard Wagner the book proved itself I mean it was the sort of book which at any rate was effective enough among the best people of its time For that reason the book should at this point be handled with some consideration and discretionIn The birth tragedy She believes Nietzsche was influential in the Black Power movement and slogan so with those Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster who created the Superman character However Ayn Rand and many others on the right and left wing could claim an influence as well despite the negative things Nietzsche said about women euality and democracy Jennifer argues that Nietzsche challenged universal truths he unveiled the human creations The madman of the book The Gay Science screaming in the street God is dead is an example of our times However the madman had concluded from people s reaction his time had not yet come After the success of the book The birth tragedy Nietzscheot to know what a nervous collapse is as well as a declining state of health unti. Ing her account with Ralph Waldo Emerson whom the seventeen year old Nietzsche read fervently she shows how Nietzsche’s ideas first burst on American shores at the turn of the twentieth century and how they continued  alternately to invigorate and to shock Americans for the century to come She also delineates the broader intellectual and cultural contexts within which a wide array of commentators academic and armchair philosophers theologians and atheists romantic poets and hard nosed empiricists and political ideologues and apostates from the Left and the Right drew insight and inspiration from Nietzsche?. ,


9 thoughts on “Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us

  1. says: Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us read & download ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB µ Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen free download American Nietzsche

    free download American Nietzsche Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review Nietzsche is a Rorschach blot for Americans blue collar workers housewives Christians political activists artists intellectuals Americans see in Nietzsche what they most desire freedom from the dead morals of a corrupt and decadent consumer society And they see in Nietzsche what they most fear a world without ultimate justification other than what the self can justify to itself by itself Ratner Rosenhagen documents Ameri

  2. says: Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us read & download ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB µ Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review

    free download American Nietzsche read & download ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB µ Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review In an article I wrote on my personal blog about the infamous prosecution of John T Scopes an American teacher put on trial in 1925 in Dayton Tennessee for teaching the Darwinian view of evolution contrary to local law I made the point that Clarence Darrow Scope’s defence attorney was an enthusiast for the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche as well as the biology of Charles Darwin He was influenced here by H L Mencken a leading

  3. says: Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review

    Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review read & download ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB µ Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen free download American Nietzsche There's like 120% of a book here but it's broken into parts there's 80% of a brilliant intellectual history of America from the 1890s to around World War I; and then there's 40% of an informative but much constrained intellectual history from the 1950s to the 1990s The first would rate four stars; the second two and so the compromise is three They are awkwardly welded together with an interlude which I guess

  4. says: free download American Nietzsche Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us read & download ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB µ Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen

    Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us Nietzsche In The United StatesJennifer Ratner Rosenhagen's book American Nietzsche A History of an Icon and his

  5. says: Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us

    Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us On the other hand looking back on the success the book had especially with the great artist to whom it addressed

  6. says: read & download ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB µ Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us

    read & download ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB µ Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review free download American Nietzsche Some time ago I mentioned to my wife that I’d been experiencing strange existential crises and I had just noticed and it was odd to me She replied that perhaps I was having a ‘mid life crisis’ and yep because she’s smart and that sounds about right She thought for a moment and asked if I had read any Nietzsche lately I consi

  7. says: Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review read & download ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB µ Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen free download American Nietzsche

    Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen µ 7 review Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us UW Madison Professor Jennifer Ratner Roshenhagen has written here a wonderful volume on the impact of Nietzsche on the United States of all places After all in her own words What is the philosophy of an anti christ

  8. says: Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us

    Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us This book Ratner Rosenhagen asserts is less about Nietzsche than it is about how Americans appropriated his idea since the late 19th century Yet she does end up sharing plenty about Nietzsche's life and his philosophy It's fascinating to learn that an anti democratic anti Christian and anti collectivist thinker would be

  9. says: Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us

    Ebook Download American Nietzsche ✓ Jennifer Ratner–Rosenhagen – doctorio.us Titanic scholarship of the titan philosopher A bit repetitive but most lengthy scholarship tends toward repetition Could really do without some of the antiuarian inspired trivia in the middle sections her so called ephemera A couple of really good reviews here on goodreads alreadyAs an aside it's hard not to be a little bewildered at the appropriation of Nietzsche by so many different and politically opposed groups but his feveri

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